Warranties? Really?

Okay we finally got the van back after the sewer disaster.  $1,400 worth of repairs.  We were afraid we might find some hot wheels or a stuffed animal or Legos, but nothing so incriminating showed up.  The grand-kids are off the hook.  The culprit, it seems was hardened glue.  When the pipe was installed at the factory they allowed fingers of glue to drip down into the pipe and harden.  Have you ever been spelunking and found stalactites or stalagmites?  That’s what it looked like. The repairman took a photo.  Now you would think that would be covered by a warranty.  No such luck.  The warranty for that part of the vehicle had run out.  Then we remembered that we had purchased an extended warranty when we bought the van.  We paid $2,300 for it because the salesman told us that it covered everything for 5 years.  It turns out that what he meant by everything was some things, but none of the things that have ever gone wrong with the van.

I am embarrassed to say that I did not really read the fine print when we bought this policy.  I know better, but I took the word of a salesman.  Now I decided to read it to see if I could find any loopholes.  I figured it would be full of them like the tax code.  I was mistaken.  It si iron clad.  If we ever decide to get rid of tax loop holes we should hire these lawyers to write the code.  Actually I did find a little clause that they forgot to remove or obscure before giving us the booklet.  I discovered that I could cancel it and get a prorated refund of the policy premium.  Unfortunately, there is not a lot of time left on it, but I will get about $600 back.

So this was an $800 lesson.  If a salesman tells you that the extended warranty covers everything, read the policy before you agree to it.  If the policy was written by “United States Warranty Corporation”, do not buy it.  If you have already bought one of these things, read the fine print while you still have time to get a refund.

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